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Digital Seminar

The Restoration of the Hijacked Self: Toward Embodiment and Connection



Trauma can have a profound impact on the sense of self, frequently leaving a lasting imprint on both cognitive and somatic domains of the sense of self. Recent provocative neurobiological findings are beginning to shed light on self-disturbance in traumatized individuals both during resting state/off task and under conditions of threat. Results are demonstrating that the brain network that underlies self-experience is most intact under states of threat. These findings may help to explain why traumatized individuals frequently seek engaging in reckless behaviour in order to ‘feel alive’. How can we work with the traumatized self to restore the sense of self at a cognitive and somatic level to reunite brain, mind, and body? An integrative, neuroscientifically-informed approach leading to the restoration of the self will be the focus of this recording.


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Product Details
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Faculty:
Ruth Lanius, MD, PhD
Duration:
2 Hours 04 Minutes
Copyright:
May 28, 2021
Product Code:
POS052731
Media Type:
Digital Seminar
Access:
Never expires.

CPD


Continuing Professional Development Certificates - PESI Australia, in collaboration with PESI in the USA, offers quality online continuing professional development events from the leaders in the field at a standard recognized by professional associations including psychology, social work, occupational therapy, alcohol and drug professionals, counselling and psychotherapy. On completion of the training, a Professional Development Certificate is issued after the individual has answered and submitted a quiz and course evaluation. This online program is worth 2.25 hours CPD.

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Faculty

Ruth Lanius, MD, PhD's Profile

Ruth Lanius, MD, PhD Related seminars and products


Ruth Lanius, MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry is the director of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) research unit at the University of Western Ontario. She established the Traumatic Stress Service and the Traumatic Stress Service Workplace Program, services that specialize in the treatment and research of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and related comorbid disorders. She currently holds the Harris-Woodman Chair in Mind-Body Medicine at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario.

Her research interests focus on studying the neurobiology of PTSD and treatment outcome research examining various pharmacological and psychotherapeutic methods. She has authored more than 100 published papers and chapters in the field of traumatic stress and is currently funded by several federal funding agencies. She regularly lectures on the topic of PTSD nationally and internationally. She has recently published a book The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease with Eric Vermetten and Clare Pain.
 

Speaker Disclosures:

Financial: Dr. Ruth Lanius has employment relationships with McMaster University, the University of Western Ontario, the Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research, the Western University of Canada, the Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research (CIMVHR), Robarts Research Institute, and Lawson Health Research Institute. She is a consultant for St. Joseph's Health Care and the Traumatic Stress Service. She receives royalties as a published author. Dr. Lanius receives recording and book royalties and a speaking honorarium from PESI, Inc. She serves on the advisory board for and receives honoraria from Mydecine. All relevant financial relationships with ineligible organizations have been mitigated.

Non-financial: Dr. Ruth Lanius is a member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, The American College of Psychiatrists, American Psychiatric Association, International Society for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Ontario Medical Association, International Society for the Study of Dissociation, New York Academy of Sciences, and the European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.


Additional Info

Program Information

Access for Self-Study (Non-Interactive)

Access never expires for this product.


Objectives

  1. Assess the brain correlates that underlie a person’s sense of self.
  2. Analyze current empirically supported literature on the self-disturbance in traumatized individuals both during resting state/off task and under conditions of threat.
  3. Create an integrative, neuroscientifically-informed approach leading to the restoration of the self.

Outline

  • Trauma can have a profound impact on the sense of self, frequently leaving a lasting imprint on both cognitive and somatic domains of the sense of self
  • Recent provocative neurobiological findings are beginning to shed light on a self-disturbance in traumatized individuals both during resting state/off task and under conditions of threat
  • Results are demonstrating that the brain network that underlies self-experience is most intact under states of threat
  • These findings may help to explain why traumatized individuals frequently seek engaging in reckless behaviour in order to ‘feel alive’
  • How can we work with the traumatized self to restore the sense of self at a cognitive and somatic level to reunite brain, mind, and body? An integrative, neuroscientifically-informed approach leading to the restoration of the self will be the focus of this lecture

Target Audience

  • Counselors
  • Social Workers
  • Psychologists
  • Psychotherapists
  • Therapists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Addiction Counselors
  • Case Managers
  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Other Mental Health Professionals

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